By: Chris Shaffer

Blue crabbing season is in full swing from Florida to Long Island and while action is excellent in some coastal areas others are having to work harder to catch bushels of crabs as extreme summer heat sets in.

When conditions get tough adding more scent to crab baits can aid in drawing more crabs in, and also from longer distances than a simple piece of chicken, bunker or any other bait would. In fact, we’ve found success soaking rags, socks and even t-shirts in Pautzke’s new Blue Crab Fuel.

Using this scent couldn’t be simpler. It’s fool proof.

 

How To Fuel Up:

Step 1: Got Bait?

Get bait. Most common is chicken, but an array of other baits is effective. If you choose to simply use a rag that applies here, too.

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Step 2: Score!

Use a knife to careful score the meat/flesh of the chicken. This enables the Blue Crab Fuel to penetrate deeper into the pieces.

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Step 3: Ziploc Is Your Friend

Take chicken (or other bait), or your rag, etc, and place it into a Ziploc.

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Step 4: Bag Contents Turn Blue

Add Blue Crab Fuel. It’s important to pour in enough to submerge the rags/bait.

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Many crabbers substitute a rag for bait. Blue Crab Fuel soaks into the rag and creates a strong scent trail that the crabs think is bait.

Step 5: The Soak

Let the rags/bait soak in Blue Crab Fuel for at least six hours. We recommend an overnight soaking. This enables the scent to integrate into the bait/rag and seep out while resting on the bottom of the bay/river/estuary/ocean. The more the scent absorbs the more effective is and the longer it lasts.

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When used, and depending on the amount of current in the system you’re crabbing, the scent will seep out for several hours. After a few hours it’s best to use a fresh piece. Oftentimes, as you see the color fading out following a few hours of use it will be time to replace bait.

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(Left) Bait after a three hour soak. (Right) Fresh bait soaked in Blu