Learn to Rejuvenate Freezer Burned Eggs with Nectar

Learn to Rejuvenate Freezer Burned Eggs with Nectar

By: Slammin Sam Baird

Most of us have been in the situation before. After working hard and following steps to ensure you’re cured eggs will fish well your bounty of cured eggs are nestled away in the freezer awaiting their turn to be put to use. Your confident last year’s eggs are going to fish as good, if not better, than fresh cured eggs.

Time has come to remove those gorgeous Pautzke cured eggs from the freezer and thaw them out to fish. You walk to the freezer, swing the door open and a look of udder disbelief, disgust and anger can be seen on your face. The airtight lid has been dislodged from the container. How could this happen after taking great care of your prized eggs? They look ruined.

Unfortunately, it’s more common than you’d expect. Those of us who freeze large quantities of eggs have had this happen. And, anglers who only have a few containers gain a level of frustration never dreamed possible. They are now freezer burned and ruined, right?

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Not so fast! Pautzke’s Nectar to the rescue! Pautzke’s Nectar is the bottled runoff from our world famous Balls ‘o Fire single salmon eggs and the only natural product that can rejuvenate freezer burned eggs (or old spawn sacks for you Great Lakes guys). Nectar magically rehydrates freezer burned cured eggs with pure salmon egg juice and enables you to salvage eggs you’d otherwise have to toss out.

Let’s focus on the best way to salvage your eggs.

 

Step 1: Act fast!

 

Don’t allow the eggs to unthaw. We want to add Nectar prior to thawing. Reason being, once the eggs start the thawing process they absorb juice and color much better than already thawed eggs.

 

Step 2: Add Red Nectar

Open a bottle of Pautzke’s Red Nectar and pour entire the bottle into a container.

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Step 3: Time To Transfer

Remove (still) frozen eggs from original container and place into the new, larger container burnt side down. This allows thawing juices and added Nectar to drown damaged eggs. (If the freezer burn has consumed all the eggs you may need more Nectar to fully cover the mass of frozen eggs.)

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Step 4: Secure Lid

Secure container with lid and place in the fridge.

 

Step 5: Let Nectar Rejuvenate Eggs

Leave container in fridge for 24 hours. Every couple hours give the container a slight shake to mix the thawing juices with the fresh Nectar. (You may fish them sooner, but the longer they sit in the juice/Nectar mix, the more hydrated the eggs become.)

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After your eggs have fully thawed they will be ready to fish. Those freezer burnt eggs that you thought were ruined will have absorbed the juice/Nectar mixture rehydrating them back to their former glory.

I hate to ever have eggs “go bad” and Pautzke’s Nectar has allowed me to further preserve my fresh eggs and also save the eggs that have fallen victim to unforeseen circumstances, like freezer burn (it’s the only product on the market that does). Try this process out the next time you find yourself standing at the freezer with the look of failure in your eye. Just remember, it’s not too late, they can be saved with Pautzke’s Nectar!

Editor’s Note: Guide Sam Baird cures hundreds of pounds of eggs annually. For more information on his guided Washington salmon trips please visit: http://slamminsalmonguideservice.com.

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2018-04-18T19:03:06+00:00

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